Revolutionizing the Hospital Call Center into a CRM-Based Engagement Center

UntitledIt should come as no surprise that today’s healthcare consumer is savvier than ever.

PricewaterhouseCoopers’ “Birth of the Healthcare Consumer” report, in fact, shows empowered consumers are shaking up the $2.8 trillion U.S. healthcare industry, piece by piece.

“With rising expectations for transparency, value, and customer service, as well as a willingness to seek healthcare service from less traditional sources,” notes PwC, “the healthcare market as we know it is being upended – and the consumer is in the driver’s seat.”

PwC makes the point that such rising consumer expectations create not just opportunities for healthcare organizations but also challenges. In order to succeed in today’s competitive healthcare landscape, in other words, health systems must distinguish themselves in three ways: 1) consumer experience, 2) consumer choice, and 3) consumer engagement.

So how can providers drive robust patient engagement, proactive coordination of care, and overall patient health? More

Rob Grant

Rob Grant

Rob is charged with advancing the company's market strategy, developing new key business relationships and growing the customer base. He is a veteran of the technology industry, with more than 20 years of executive experience in leading innovation, business strategy, new business development, sales, finance and operations. He has led large-scale technology projects for healthcare systems, educational institutions and Fortune-100 companies. A particular emphasis has been in helping corporations and healthcare organizations transform the way they go-to-market through the utilization of new technology.
Rob Grant

Proactive Health: The Challenges to Success and the Benefits to Providers and Patients

This post is a third in a series that discusses proactive health – how the U.S. healthcare system is transforming to a proactive health model, the definition of proactive health, the elements to commit, the challenges, and the benefits. Read the first post, “From Reactive to Proactive Health,” and second post, “Proactive Health: The Elements of a Provider’s Commitment.”

The Challenges to Achieving Proactive Health

Proactive Health is a challenging objective for all providers and physicians and in spite of their personal commitment and the available technology, there are obstacles when trying to move to a proactive health model.

The first step in embracing a proactive health model is for the provider and physicians to agree to take on risk – something only insurers have done in the past. However, before you commit to taking on risk, you need to be able to assess it – analyze the target population, identify access points and market penetration, understand how to spread the risk across the network, etc.

To assess the risk, you need technologyCRM and business intelligence / predictive analytic tools. More

Rob Grant

Rob Grant

Rob is charged with advancing the company's market strategy, developing new key business relationships and growing the customer base. He is a veteran of the technology industry, with more than 20 years of executive experience in leading innovation, business strategy, new business development, sales, finance and operations. He has led large-scale technology projects for healthcare systems, educational institutions and Fortune-100 companies. A particular emphasis has been in helping corporations and healthcare organizations transform the way they go-to-market through the utilization of new technology.
Rob Grant

Proactive Health: The Elements of a Provider’s Commitment

This is the second post in our series on how the U.S. healthcare system is transforming to a proactive health model, the definition of proactive health, the elements to commit, the challenges, and the benefits. Read the first post, “From Reactive to Proactive Health.”

TeamworkAccountable Care Organizations (ACOs) are testing the concept of proactive health.

Since providers and physicians that belong to an ACO have responsibility for the quality and cost of care, they develop different attitudes. As a provider, you can no longer wait for the sick patient to present. Instead, you must continuously evaluate what the patient will need, when the patient will need it, how the patient will get it, and collaborate with the patient to execute on a continuous care plan.

However, it takes more than your personal commitment as a provider or physician to execute proactive health. It also takes technology. More

Rob Grant

Rob Grant

Rob is charged with advancing the company's market strategy, developing new key business relationships and growing the customer base. He is a veteran of the technology industry, with more than 20 years of executive experience in leading innovation, business strategy, new business development, sales, finance and operations. He has led large-scale technology projects for healthcare systems, educational institutions and Fortune-100 companies. A particular emphasis has been in helping corporations and healthcare organizations transform the way they go-to-market through the utilization of new technology.
Rob Grant

From Reactive to Proactive Health

This is the first post in our three part series on proactive healthcare. Stay tuned for parts two and three where we’ll discuss what healthcare providers must do to commit to proactive health and the challenges they face in doing so.
For decades, both the healthcare industry and U.S. government have been focused on managing healthcare costs, quality, and access. However, the U.S. healthcare system is still far off from optimizing improvement in any one of these three areas.

  • From a cost perspective, healthcare costs rose at double the rate of inflation in the 1990s and were again on the rise in the early 2000s. In 2014, healthcare was 9% of the GDP, up from just over 12% in 1990.
  • From a quality perspective, technologies such as the electronic medical record (EMR) have helped providers enhanced the quality of care by improving diagnosis and treatment with fewer errors. Fortunately, government intervention helped make the EMR a reality, particularly the Patient Protection & Affordable Care Act (ACA) enacted in 2010. By 2013, 59% of hospitals had adopted at least a basic EHR system, an increase of 34% from over 2012 and a five-fold increase since 2008. In addition, 93% of U.S. hospitals possess EHR technology certified as meeting federal requirements for Meaningful Use Unfortunately, as a single tool, the EMR does not solve all of the problems in the “cost, quality, and access” continuum.
  • The U.S. has made many attempts to improve access. The HMO Act of 1973 and the promotion of more liberal HMOs and preferred-provider organizations in later years improved access to some extent but it also increased costs.
  • A key objective of the ACA was to open up access to healthcare services and better manage costs by addressing the insurance part of the access equation. Now five years later, the jury is still out as to whether the ACA will meet the access objective.

More

Rob Grant

Rob Grant

Rob is charged with advancing the company's market strategy, developing new key business relationships and growing the customer base. He is a veteran of the technology industry, with more than 20 years of executive experience in leading innovation, business strategy, new business development, sales, finance and operations. He has led large-scale technology projects for healthcare systems, educational institutions and Fortune-100 companies. A particular emphasis has been in helping corporations and healthcare organizations transform the way they go-to-market through the utilization of new technology.
Rob Grant

Spring Has Sprung! Evariant’s Newest Release of our CRM Platform and Applications

We are pleased to announce Evariant’s next major platform release. 

Our latest release is comprised of two major components: improving and expanding current product functionality for our existing solutions, and adding additional capabilities to enhance the overall user experience.

Since the beginning, we have asked our customers to provide us with feedback on their experiences with the solution: what’s been working; what can we do to improve the solution so that it helps them achieve their goals. Our customers provided us with insights, and we listened. And, we have drawn from our own vast expertise and knowledge of the health care industry, as well as future trends in digital marketing and big data to deliver what we consider a game-changing release for health systems.

Let’s start with the exciting new capabilities we’re introducing with this release: the Evariant Contact Center and Evariant PRM Go!

These solutions were designed to help health systems create richer engagements with key constituents, while simultaneously optimizing their care strategies. More

Rob Grant

Rob Grant

Rob is charged with advancing the company's market strategy, developing new key business relationships and growing the customer base. He is a veteran of the technology industry, with more than 20 years of executive experience in leading innovation, business strategy, new business development, sales, finance and operations. He has led large-scale technology projects for healthcare systems, educational institutions and Fortune-100 companies. A particular emphasis has been in helping corporations and healthcare organizations transform the way they go-to-market through the utilization of new technology.
Rob Grant